Friday, September 30, 2011

What your mobile phone will reveal


The following information comes from a Department of Justice document name “Retention Periods of Major Cellular Service Providers,” and is marked “Law Enforcement Use Only.” Here’s what they prefer the public not know:

Verizon keeps a list of everyone you’ve exchanged text messages with for the past year. Sprint keeps the list for 18 months, T-Mobile for up to five years, and it’s seven years for AT&T. That makes Verizon appear to have the most privacy-friendly policy, right? Not quite—Verizon retains the actual contents of text messages for five days.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Privacy consultations in SPAIN


I am flying to Europe at the end of October. There is still time to arrange meetings in these two locations:

Madrid
Canary Islands


If this is of interest, please tell me exactly what it is you need help with. If this is for a business consultation, perhaps your trip will be tax-deductible.

JJL {at} canaryislandspress {dot} com

Sunday, September 18, 2011

BEST PLACES for vehicle registrations, a newletter, and for the new three-volume “Lifeboat” series


Some of these I've mentioned before, but they bear repeating:

BEST PLACE TO REGISTER A CARGO TRAILER


Michigan. They have a "permanent" license plate that you never have to renew!

BEST STATE TO REGISTER A CAR, MOTORCYCLE, OR TRAILER

Washington state. If you are not a resident, the DMV allows you to register your vehicle in the name of an LLC with a foreign ghost address without listing any address whosoever in the United States.

BEST TOWN IN WHICH TO HIDE FROM A BILL COLLECTOR


Unalaska, Alaska. The city covers part of the island and all of neighboring Amaknak Island where the Port of Dutch Harbor is located. (Home of the TV program “DEADLIEST CATCH.") This is one of the most costly and difficult places to travel to, while still remaining in the United States. (Saint Paul, Alaska is even worse but you do not want to go there.)

BEST DAILY NEWS LETTER ABOUT INVESTING AND MOVING OFFSHORE


Simon Black (http://www.sovereignman.com). “In the last 3 months I’ve traveled to over 20 countries, met with a President and several diplomats … hitchhiked in Bogota … [and] lectured on entrepreneurship in Eastern Europe. I’m a student of the world, and I believe that travel is the greatest teacher.”

THE TWO BEST BOOKS ON PRIVACY

How to be Invisible
is one, of course. The other is Mark Nestman’s “LIFEBOAT” three-volume set (copyright 2011). I asked Mark about a possible discount for my readers, but he says no. Nevertheless, if you order through the link below, I will offer a choice of any e-book free, or a $100 discount on any ghost address. Just e-mail me the receipt from Mark in order to claim your bonus. Offer ends September 30, 2011. Check this out at http://www.nestmann.com/catalog/lifeboat-strategy-legally-protecting-wealth-privacy-21st-centuryem-2011-volume-p-29.html?ref=21

You won’t be disappointed!

.

Friday, September 9, 2011

How can even a small-time PI track you down?


Gone are the days of "Come, Watson, come! The game is afoot. Not a word! Into your clothes and come!" If Sherlock Holmes were alive today, he would be sitting at a desk, just like so many other small-time PIs are doing at this very moment.

All your local PI has to do to find your home address is to run whatever data he’s been given, using paid national and international databases, common Internet searches, and social media site searches.

He may make phone calls to your family and friends or to church members if the client has provided that contact information, and he has an ample supply of “pretexts” up his sleeve to track you down in a matter of hours.

As outlined in How to be Invisible, the only way to protect yourself in such a case is to move. Once you do, never give out your home address again. A few close friends and relatives will know it, of course, but caution them against the possibility of a pretext call from a PI. They must either give him false information (“He moved to Alaska but I don’t know where”) or no information at all.

Friday, September 2, 2011

Two good reasons to be on my email list


1. If there is some breaking news about privacy, you may be the first to hear about it.

2. Many brief discounts are offered via e-mail only. These include offers regarding e-books, ghost addresses, consulting, and ocassionally even NM LLCs with slow-selling names.

These e-mails are usually sent out just one or two times per month. To sign up, go to the forum and follow instructions.

At the bottom of each e-mail there is a link where you can unsubscribe. Once you do that, you will never hear from me again.

=================================